The association between early childhood special education teachers’ beliefs about literacy and fidelity of implementation

The association between early childhood special education teachers’ beliefs about literacy and fidelity of implementation

First Author: Jaclyn Dynia -- The Ohio State University
Additional authors/chairs: 
Tina Younoszai
Keywords: Fidelity, Teacher beliefs, Self-Efficacy
Abstract / Summary: 

◦ The aim of the current study is to examine teachers’ beliefs as they relate to fidelity of implementation (FOI). Research questions were: (a) to what extent are teachers’ beliefs and teacher efficacy related to teachers’ FOI and (b) to what extent does teacher efficacy moderate the association between teachers’ FOI and teachers’ beliefs.
◦ Seventy-seven ECSE teachers participated. Teachers’ beliefs were measured using the Preschool Teacher Literacy Beliefs Questionnaire subtests beliefs about code-related instruction and book reading (Hindman & Wasik, 2008; Seefeldt, 2004). Teacher efficacy was assessed using an adapted version of the Teacher Self-Efficacy Scale subtests of instructional and language and literacy efficacy (Bandura, 1997). Teacher fidelity was measured using the Fidelity Coding Checklist – an observational coding scheme that examines the frequency of teachers’ references to print.
◦ In the final model, teachers’ education and beliefs about code-related instruction are significant predictors of teachers’ fidelity, with teachers with a master’s degree and more positive beliefs about code-related instruction having higher fidelity scores. The interaction term between code-related beliefs and teacher efficacy of language and literacy was also a significant predictor of teachers’ fidelity.
◦ Findings indicated that teacher efficacy moderated the association between positive beliefs about code-related instruction and teacher fidelity. Researchers should be aware of teachers’ beliefs and efficacy when designing studies to increase overall FOI.