To be or not to be correlated, that is the question: More evidences on SVR

To be or not to be correlated, that is the question: More evidences on SVR

First Author: Ping Wang -- Middle Tennessee State University
Additional authors/chairs: 
Jwa K. Kim
Keywords: Reading comprehension, simple view of reading, Vocabulary, Literacy development, Elementary
Abstract / Summary: 

Purpose- Previous studies have challenged the simple view of reading by arguing that decoding and language comprehension are not independent. This study investigated the relationship among the three latent variables: reading comprehension (RC), decoding (D) and linguistic comprehension (LC) in later elementary grade.
Method: A sample of 87 fourth graders from four rural schools in the Southeastern US were administered three standardized reading comprehension tests (Woodcock–Johnson Tests of Achievement–4th edition, Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test-4th edition, and Wechsler Individual Achievement Test- 3rd edition) and five relevant measures on word reading, pseudoword reading, reading fluency, vocabulary, and morphological awareness. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was applied to discern the relationship between decoding and linguistic comprehension in association with reading comprehension.
Results: The results indicated that there was a strong correlation (.78) between D and LC. For fourth graders in the current sample, LC explained most of variance of RC. Decoding itself did not significantly influence reading comprehension but covary with linguistic comprehension. The SEM results showed a strong model-data fit with CMIN/DF= 1.78, CFI=.969, TLI=.949, RMSEA=.095.
Conclusion: For fourth graders in this study, D and LC were not independent in explaining the variance of RC. Vocabulary knowledge was the strongest predictor of linguistic comprehension after controlling for fluency and morphological awareness. Implications for educational practice, especially for vocabulary instruction were discussed.