Determining the Academic and Affective Outcomes of Dyad Reading Among Third Graders

Determining the Academic and Affective Outcomes of Dyad Reading Among Third Graders

First Author: Jacob Downs -- Utah State University
Additional authors/chairs: 
Dr. Kathleen Mohr
Keywords: Attitudes, Fluency, Comprehension, Grade 3, Shared Book Reading
Abstract / Summary: 

This session outlines findings of a recent study investigating the influence of dyad
reading on the affective and academic outcomes of third graders. Dyad reading describes when
a higher-level reading partner is paired with a lower-level reading partner to orally read a text.
In this intervention, the selected texts were above the lower-level partner’s independent reading
level. Previous studies indicate that dyad reading can support reading fluency and
comprehension among lower proficiency readers (Brown, Mohr, Wilcox, & Barrett, 2017;
Morgan, Wilcox, & Eldredge, 2000). To date however, no studies have investigated the
influence of dyad reading on student attitudes toward reading. In this study, 177 third graders
read in dyads for 15 minutes daily for 90 school days. Researchers used fluency and
comprehension data and assessed reader attitudes of the students reading in dyads and those
in a control group. Results from the mixed effects linear modeling indicate that students who
participated in dyad reading experienced no greater gains in reading fluency than those in the
control. However, the growth of reading comprehension for the lower-level dyad readers was
significantly better compared to their counterparts (ES = 0.35, p < 0.01). Importantly, students who participated
in dyad reading experienced a general decline in reader attitudes compared to students in the
control group. These mixed findings on affective and academic outcomes suggest a more
nuanced view of the use and benefit of dyad reading for practitioners. Implications include
designing dyad reading in ways that can support reading comprehension without eroding reader
attitudes.