Do teacher ratings of self-regulation uniquely predict reading comprehension when controlling for teacher perceptions of academic competence?

Do teacher ratings of self-regulation uniquely predict reading comprehension when controlling for teacher perceptions of academic competence?

First Author: Andrew Weaver -- New York University
Additional authors/chairs: 
Michael Kieffer
Keywords: Self-regulation, Teacher perceptions, Reading comprehension, Executive Functions, Adolescence
Abstract / Summary: 

Purpose: Despite growing interest in the role of teacher ratings of inattentive behaviors and hyperactive behaviors in reading development, there is limited evidence that these measures meaningfully predict reading comprehension above and beyond teacher perceptions of academic ability. We examined whether teacher ratings of inattentive and hyperactive behaviors predict reading comprehension when controlling for teacher ratings of academic competence and direct assessments of executive functions (EFs) for Spanish-English bilingual students in Grades 7 and 8.

Method: A longitudinal cohort of Spanish-English bilingual students (N = 107) completed measures of reading comprehension and EFs in Grades 7 and 8, while teachers completed ratings of students’ hyperactive behaviors, inattentive behaviors, and academic competence in reading. Multiple regression was used to examine the relations between these measures.

Results: Preliminary results indicate that hyperactive and inattentive behaviors negatively predict reading comprehension when controlling for direct assessments of EFs, but this relation is not significant when controlling for ratings of academic competence.

Conclusions: The negative relation between inattentive or hyperactive behaviors and reading comprehension may be explained by teacher perceptions of academic competence in reading. Better measures of inattentive and hyperactive behaviors may be needed to evaluate their relation with reading comprehension.