The Effect of Student SES Status on Test Items of Expository Text

The Effect of Student SES Status on Test Items of Expository Text

First Author: Laura Clark Briggs -- Middle Tennessee State University
Additional authors/chairs: 
Jwa Kim
Keywords: Vocabulary, Familial Risk, Text Complexity, Informational Text, socioeconomic status
Abstract / Summary: 

Because of the great difficulty that many students in American public schools experience navigating expository text, a significant and concerted effort has been made to increase the amount of time that students spend reading expository (often referred to as informational and also described as complex) text. Many states have adopted the Common Core State Standards in an effort to insure that students have more exposure to complex text that should prepare them for reading demands that they will encounter not only postsecondary academic pursuits, but also in their future careers. A wide body of research exists that shows the relationship between prior knowledge and performance on reading comprehension; likewise, researchers have shown the examined how children’s exposure to print material and access to vocabulary is quite varied depending on the family’s socioeconomic (SES) status. This study examines student performance on test items of expository text from 11th grade students taking English III classes in several high schools throughout the southern part of the United States. A latent growth curve analysis is used to examine student performance on reading comprehension tests administered at three time points throughout the year. This research in progress examines performance of students based on their socioeconomic status to compare their how SES and student scores correlate.

Status: In progress
Keywords: vocabulary, latent growth curve analysis, informational text, complex text, expository text, socioeconomic status, SES