IGDI-Español: Demographic Features Correlating with Differential Tier Assignments on Three Measures of Oral Language

IGDI-Español: Demographic Features Correlating with Differential Tier Assignments on Three Measures of Oral Language

First Author: Chase Callard -- Utah State University
Additional authors/chairs: 
Lillian Durán; Alisha Wackerle-Hollman; Jose Palma; Theresa Kohlmeier; Stephanie Brunner
Keywords: English Language Learners (ELL), Spanish, Assessment, Bilingualism, Response to Intervention
Abstract / Summary: 

Purpose. The new Spanish Individual Growth and Development Indicators (IGDI-Español) are a set of universal screening measures developed for use within Response to Intervention frameworks. The purpose of this poster is to explore demographic features that correlate with differential tier designations on the three IGDI-Español oral language screening measures: Picture Naming, Expressive Verbs, and Let’s go to the store!, an innovative storybook-based measure designed to capture more naturalistic language samples.
Method. Four hundred sixty-five Spanish-English bilingual (SEB) preschoolers (age 4- to 5-years old) recruited from Utah, Minnesota, Florida, and California participated. All children received all measures. Picture naming requires children to identify the name of the item on the card. The expressive verb measure requires children to identify the action that is depicted on the card. The storybook measure embeds testing prompts that target both expressive and receptive language in a book format.
Results. Children were assigned tier level candidacy based on previously established cut scores. The children who receive different tier designations across the storybook measure and either picture naming or expressive verbs, or both, will be examined in terms of their: preferred/dominant language profile (obtained through parent survey), language of instruction in the school setting, and sex.
Conclusion. The type of measures used with SEB populations may produce varying results in terms of tier designation, and demographic features of participants may or may not correlate to that variance. Testing in naturalistic contexts may produce more accurate representations of children’s language ability for individuals with particular demographic features.