Learning from Challenging Text, A Technological Driven, Adaptive Solution to Poor Comprehension Skills

Learning from Challenging Text, A Technological Driven, Adaptive Solution to Poor Comprehension Skills

First Author: Donna Caccamise -- University of Colorado
Additional authors/chairs: 
David Quigley; Rachel Lieber; John Weatherley
Keywords: Adolescent Reading, Curriculum Development, Learning, Text Comprehension, Computational modelling
Abstract / Summary: 

Purpose: This poster will include a demo of eBRAVO, a theory-based intervention that targets well-documented weaknesses in reading comprehension for expository texts, which typically persist and significantly impact students’ further academic progress. These weaknesses not only contribute significantly to the high drop-out rates in high school but also negatively impact students’ ability to pursue careers that depend heavily on building domain knowledge. This project builds on a teacher-led classroom curriculum tested via an efficacy trial that yielded positive results. eBRAVO is a student-led, web-based curriculum that provides better fidelity and interactivity of instructional sequences and addresses individual student needs. This poster and available demo will provide lessons learned from integrating a flexible curriculum into traditional classrooms.
Method: eBRAVO was developed using principles of dber, It uses underlying AI to adapt comprehension instruction as the reader builds knowledge across 12 chapters on related ecology topics.
Results: Data include click streams, ecology content and reading process testing, usability focus groups (teachers and students). Subjects were secondary level students; grades 6-9. Improvements in students’ ability to learn from text, as well as issues around technology-driven individualized instruction within traditional classroom settings will be discussed.
Conclusions: The power of technology and machine learning to “right size” instruction for individual students holds much promise for improving student learning outcomes, but making way for this approach in traditional classroom settings brings up complex issues around pedagogy, curriculum content, even educational policies. We hope this poster and demo will generate a lively discussion around these issues.