The performance of adolescents with developmental disabilities in reading comprehension

The performance of adolescents with developmental disabilities in reading comprehension

First Author: Badriah Basma -- McGill University
Additional authors/chairs: 
Catherine Archambault; Domenico Tullo; Armando Bertone
Keywords: Developmental Disabilities, Education, simple view of reading
Abstract / Summary: 

Purpose
The Simple View of Reading (SVR) framework suggests that skilled reading depends on two conditions that contribute to reading comprehension: word reading and linguistic comprehension (i.e., listening comprehension). The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of word reading and listening comprehension to predict reading comprehension in predominantly lower functioning adolescents with developmental disabilities. Based on previous studies with typically developing students, we expect that both listening comprehension and word -reading will predict reading comprehension.
Methods
We tested 66 adolescents with developmental disabilities aged 13-17 years (MFSIQ =52.15; 41 males, 25 females). Participants completed three subtests of the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test III (WIAT III). The WIAT is an individually administered and standardized test battery commonly used to assess academic achievement in children and adolescents in reading comprehension, listening comprehension, and word reading (Wechsler, 2009).
Results
A multiple regression was carried out to investigate whether listening comprehension and word reading significantly predict participants’ reading comprehension. Results indicated that the model was a significant predictor of reading comprehension, F (2, 65) = 64.013, p < .001, and explained 67% of the variance. Listening comprehension contributed significantly to the model B = .772, p < .001, and word reading also significantly contributed to the model B = .433, p < .001.
Conclusion
Our results suggest that the SVR can also be used to explain reading performance of students with developmental disabilities. Educational practices in special education may benefit from these findings in the implementation of reading interventions for reading comprehension.