Reading motivation and achievement in elementary school: Findings from Chilean low-performing readers

Reading motivation and achievement in elementary school: Findings from Chilean low-performing readers

First Author: Paula Baldwin --
Additional authors/chairs: 
Pelusa Orellana; Carolina Melo
Abstract / Summary: 

Research has consistently documented the relationship between reading comprehension and reading motivation (Shaeffner & Schiefele, 2016; Solheim, 2011; Taboada, Honks, Wigfield, & Guthrie, 2009). Students who enjoy and value reading, and who consider themselves good readers tend to have better reading outcomes than those who don't (Lepola, Vauras, & Maki, 2000; Chapman & Tunmer, 2007). In the current study, we examine the relationships between readers’ self-concept, value of reading, and reading achievement in 1200 Chilean elementary school students. Using regressions, we analyzed beginning and end-of-year scores for reading ability, reader's self-concept and value of reading in grades 3, 4, and 5. Results showed that, for low-achieving readers, motivation to read at the beginning of the year predicts end-of-year comprehension. Children who start the year off with lower reading abilities but higher levels of reading motivation have better reading scores than those with lower motivation and lower reading skills at the end of the year. Students with higher scores in motivation to read reach end of year reading scores that are approximately 30% higher than those of their peers having lower reading motivation at the beginning of the school year. The pedagogical implications are discussed.