Reading predictors in Brazilian children with learning disabilities, with and without phonological disorders

Reading predictors in Brazilian children with learning disabilities, with and without phonological disorders

First Author: Alexandre Lucas de Araújo Barbosa -- UFRN
Additional authors/chairs: 
Ana Beatriz Leite Anjos; Ana Carolina Dantas de Medeiros; Mellissa Mayene Alves; Cíntia Alves Salgado Azoni
Keywords: Predictors of reading skills, Phonology, Phonological awareness, rapid automatized naming, Working memory
Abstract / Summary: 

Purpose: changes in phonological acquisition can cause direct difficulties in written language. The aim of the study was to compare the performance of students with learning disabilities with and without phonological disorders in orality, regarding phonological awareness, phonological access to mental lexicon and phonological working memory. Method: This is cross-sectional, quantitative study approved by the Ethics Committee. 34 sample of children between 8 and 14 years old: Group 1- 17 students with learning difficulties and phonological disorders; Group 2- 17 students with learning disabilities without phonological disorders. The phonology of the groups were assessed thru Child Language Test ABFW and then divided. Following Phonological Awareness – Sequential Assessment Instrument CONFIAS was evaluated; phonological access to mental lexicon – Rapid Automatized Naming (RAN) and Phonological Working Memory –Test of repetition of nonwords. Statistical analysis was analyzed with the Mann-Whitney test, with a confidence interval of 95% and 0.05 significance level. Results: The phonological disorders frequently found in G1 were consonant cluster simplification (n = 15), liquid simplification (n = 9) and simplifying final consonant (n = 6), considering more than one exchange per child. Statistically significant differences in phonological awareness syllable level (p = 0.01), phonemic (p = 0.00) and total (p = 0.00); rapid automatized naming of digits (p = 0.03), colors (p = 0.05) and objects (p = 0.04), with improved performance G2. Conclusions: The worst performance in reading predictors in G1 evidenced the important relationship between these abilities and phonology in students with learning disabilities.