Relationship between reading knowledge and writing performance at the end of Kindergarten, 1st Grade, and 2nd Grade

Relationship between reading knowledge and writing performance at the end of Kindergarten, 1st Grade, and 2nd Grade

First Author: Rocío Castiñeira Seoane -- Universidad de La Laguna
Additional authors/chairs: 
Nuria Gutiérrez ; Juan E. Jiménez
Keywords: reading and writing relationship, Regression models, Reading Ability, Writing performance
Abstract / Summary: 

The objective of this study was to explore the reading predictors (e.g., alphabetic knowledge, phonemic awareness, reading comprehension, vocabulary, reading fluency and prosody) in writing performance in a dictation task in Spanish at the end of Kindergarten, 1st Grade, and 2nd Grade. We hypothesized that these predictors will explain a significant variance of the writing performance and will change across courses due to instruction and exposure to print.
A multiple regression model was constructed. At the beginning of the scholar year, a sample of 183 Kindergarten, 175 1st Grade, and 334 2nd Grade Spanish students were evaluated with IPAL (Indicators of Progress of Learning in Reading, Indicadores del Progreso de Aprendizaje en Lectura; Jiménez & Gutiérrez, 2018) a Curriculum Based Measurement (CBM). At the end of the scholar year, the same students were assessed with the screener EGRA (Early Grade Reading Assessment, Jiménez, 2008).
The regression analysis revealed that concepts about print was the only significant predictor across all the scholar years, whereas reading comprehension and vocabulary was a significant predictor in first and second grade.
In English, an opaque language, different studies have shown the relevance of reading competence for writing performance (Abbott, Berninger, & Fayol, 2010; Graham et al., 2017). Our results, in a transparent language, also suggest the relative relevance of reading knowledge, such as concepts about print, for the writing performance. Even more, as children progressed through the grades, reading comprehension and vocabulary became more characteristic of the reading-writing relationship suggesting how this change over time.