Teacher implementation of tier 2 literacy intervention

Teacher implementation of tier 2 literacy intervention

First Author: Rebecca Silverman -- Stanford Unviersitry
Additional authors/chairs: 
Kristin Keane; Karen Taylor
Keywords: Response to Intervention, Early Literacy
Abstract / Summary: 

In order to provide support for students reading and writing below grade level, many schools have adopted a Response to Intervention (RTI) approach in which struggling students are provided with supplemental intervention in addition to their regular literacy instruction. RTI has been proposed a possible solution to addressing persistent achievement gaps in literacy and to more accurately identifying students for special education, with evidence that these students have not responded to evidence-based supplemental instruction and may need more to catch up to their peers in literacy (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2006; Mesmer & Mesmer, 2008). However, research by Balu et al. (2017) on RTI revealed that, "assignment to receive reading interventions did not improve reading outcomes; it produced negative impacts.” Fuchs and Fuchs (2017) and others have argued that the study was flawed because it did not account for the variability in implementation or the interaction between intervention content and students' needs. Fuchs and Ssuchs (2017) go on to write, "Fuchs and Fuchs (2017) echo this when they write, “We urge everyone to look at current RTI practice with eyes wide open… and to ask how we can make RTI more effective for the millions of American students who are very much in need of help." Thus, the present study is aimed at investigating the role of teacher implementation of RTI intervention and the degree to which intervention matches students' needs. The study is set in a large urban district with district-wide implementation of RTI. It follows 8 interventionists working with 2-3 intervention groups each in kindergarten through second grade. Data include observations of intervention implementation (coded for instructor moves), teacher interview data, and student assessment data. Results suggest that teacher preparation and support and the extent to which intervention is aligned with or adapted to meet astudents' needs are critical to the success of RTI implementation.